In regard to the new Bronco release

Belizeit

CJ-8 Member
CJ-8.com Member
City
River Ridge
State
La
#7
My brother had a FJ60 back in the mid 70s that had a little age then with a Chevy 350. Drove great
 

93_Fummins

CJ-8 Member
CJ-8.com Member
City
Edmond
State
OK
#9
Isn't the top "History of Jeep" picture actually a bunch of FORD GPW's??? Which were responsible for the coining of the phrase "G-P" "geep" "jeep" in the first place.... *stirring pot*
 

Ron84cj

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
West Bend
State
WI
#11
Isn't the top "History of Jeep" picture actually a bunch of FORD GPW's??? Which were responsible for the coining of the phrase "G-P" "geep" "jeep" in the first place.... *stirring pot*
You just had to get me started... lol Ford gpws didn't come along until AFTER they were nicknamed jeeps. The famous picture of the jeep driving up the stairs at the Capitol proves this. Also, the term "jeep" actually dates back to WW1.
 

Kane

CJ-8 Member
CJ-8.com Member
City
Berlin
State
ct
#12
You just had to get me started... lol Ford gpws didn't come along until AFTER they were nicknamed jeeps. The famous picture of the jeep driving up the stairs at the Capitol proves this. Also, the term "jeep" actually dates back to WW1.
This is correct. Jeep came from the vehicles being called General Purpose which was shortened to GP, hence jeep.
 

Ron84cj

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
West Bend
State
WI
#13
Unless I have misunderstood something even "general purpose" was also just a nickname. "G" stands for government, "P" represents 80 inch wheelbase, and "W" stood for Willys. The Ford GPW wasn't built until after Willy's couldn't keep up with the war demand. The famous picture of where the Jeep drove up the stairs and was publicly called "JEEP" on February 19, 1941 was before the Ford GPW came along.

The other common one I hear is that the name came from Eugene the jeep from Popeye. "Jeep Jeep" first appeared March 16, 1936. So at this point we can definitely rule out the jeep came from "gp, general purpose." As much as I love Popeye, I don't think this is where it came from either. We need to go back further in time.

In WW1 new recruits that had not seen battle were sometimes called "jeeps." The mechanics and others at the time also used the term for untested vehicles. There were certainly plenty of people that had served in both WW1 and WW2. It would come as no surprise if the term "Jeep" just carried over.

Regardless of where the name came from, our beloved Jeeps still started out kicking a$$ as a WW2 vehicle. 😎
 
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