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Meet Red, my 81 Restomod Build

Olin

Basic User
Silver Member
City
Williston
State
ND
Wow! Never seen that one before! It blows my mind how many local Scramblers are around here!

This one is next level- custom soft top, supercharged LS, interesting suspension work. Wow. Just wow.



You are viewing a 1982 Jeep CJ-8 Scrambler with some serious custom modifications. This Scrambler has undergone a complete nut and bolt tear down and built back up to what you see today. It has only 3100 miles on it since the build and began with a very straight and rust free body and chassis with only 136000 miles on it.

This CJ-8 Scrambler Rock Crawler is a beast, powered by a 5.3 LS Chevrolet engine with a PowerDyne Supercharger. Behind the engine is a MV4500 5-Speed manual transmission and a Dual stick NP205 2-speed transfer case, the front and rear differentials are Dayna 60 lockers with 4.10 gearing.

Other key components of the build are; Custom heavy duty front bumper with winch mount, Halo LED headlamps, LED turn signals, Rhino lined fender flares, LED running lights, Aluminum radiator, Derale electric cooling fan, H/D alternator, Power steering, Serpentine belt system, Electronic ignition, Custom ceramic coated headers, Custom dual exhaust, Heavy duty front suspension, Front sway bar, PSC steering stabilizer, Fox 2.0 Performance Series front and rear shocks shocks, Deaver springs, Cross drilled and slotted brake rotors, Hydraulic clutch, Custom rocker steps, Tinted glass, Louvered hood, Fold down windshield, Custom black soft top, Custom wiring, Speed Hut GPS speedometer with tach/fuel/temp gauges, Speed Hut boost and oil pressure gauges, Custom 5 switch dash panel, Tilt steering column, Kenwood stereo system, Dual USB ports, Master Craft Safety Baja RS upholstered front and rear seats with Sparco 4-point seat harnesses, Custom multi point roll cage, Raceline black 17” simulated bead lock alloy wheels, Open Country 35x12.50R17 tires, Walker Driveline driveshafts, Mini tubed, 37 gallon fuel tank, JCR rear bumper and carrier. All finished off in Bright Blue Metallic paint.

This 1982 Jeep CJ-8 Scrambler runs drives as good as it looks.View attachment 97347
I was just wondering if powder coating all my hinges satin black would look okay but couldn't find any examples in my online searches. And now, here one is! Looks quite alright!
 

AdamH

Scrambler Junkie
BENEFACTOR
Gold Member
Lifetime Member
SOA Member
City
Mt Holly
State
NC
Lots of power is great as long as the rest of the vehicle is designed / built to handle it and get it to the ground in a controllable way
 

Randyzzz

Blown Budget
BENEFACTOR
Gold Member
Lifetime Member
SOA Member
City
Redmond
State
OR
Lots of power is great as long as the rest of the vehicle is designed / built to handle it and get it to the ground in a controllable way
I don’t know…as kids we built some awful crazy stuff and it was always a hoot. It’s sorta liberating knowing that total insanity is just another 3/4” of pedal travel away. But I have always been a HP/torque junkie. Not so much a need to go fast, more of a twisted desire to shred tires at will. To hear the exhaust roar and feel the rear end get loose. Sort of like driving a monster truck- I could do that all day long.
 

Randyzzz

Blown Budget
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Gold Member
Lifetime Member
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City
Redmond
State
OR
Finished up the indicator lights. Is it a perfect color match? No. Is it close enough to look good? Yes. It’s odd how colors seem to change depending on the ambient light, and I don’t think there’s really any way to match OLED lights with LED’s. The pictures make the Speedhut lights look greenish… Anyways. Put quick disconnects on the back with heat shrink for stress relief. They will plug right into the harness I made. 4724251E-21D9-4A99-9533-37AE8A4905E4.jpeg56EB0021-0B5C-43C7-A4C7-BAE1637B1760.jpeg5E51F723-FC89-45B9-9CA5-D015276D56D9.jpeg
 

Randyzzz

Blown Budget
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Gold Member
Lifetime Member
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Redmond
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OR
Next I installed a bulkhead terminal for battery pass through for the stereo amp.

C3B9EDA5-16DE-47D9-8511-837C2E4B770D.jpeg77DBBCAA-5FDB-466D-84F9-7134981AD6F6.jpegI’ll need to build some kind of shield to keep the passenger’s feet off of it but that shouldn’t be hard.
 

Azbball11

Member
Member
City
Weston
State
WI
Finished up the indicator lights. Is it a perfect color match? No. Is it close enough to look good? Yes. It’s odd how colors seem to change depending on the ambient light, and I don’t think there’s really any way to match OLED lights with LED’s. The pictures make the Speedhut lights look greenish… Anyways. Put quick disconnects on the back with heat shrink for stress relief. They will plug right into the harness I made. View attachment 97783View attachment 97785View attachment 97784
That dash looks amazing. Updated yet very classic - looks like it belongs!
 

Chamba

Not obsessed: focused.
Member
SOA Member
City
Vero Beach
State
FL
Now I want you to imagine some other guy driving Red through the Oregon hills every weekend and looking at those amazing dash lights and listening to tunes through that killer bulkhead pass through......

And then ask yourself whether you should keep Red.
 

Randyzzz

Blown Budget
BENEFACTOR
Gold Member
Lifetime Member
SOA Member
City
Redmond
State
OR
Now I want you to imagine some other guy driving Red through the Oregon hills every weekend and looking at those amazing dash lights and listening to tunes through that killer bulkhead pass through......

And then ask yourself whether you should keep Red.
Red’s a keeper.

Just a bit down right now realizing winter is almost here and no matter when I get Red finished I won’t be driving until spring.
 

Belizeit

CJ-8 Member
Gold Member
City
River Ridge
State
La
Red’s a keeper.

Just a bit down right now realizing winter is almost here and no matter when I get Red finished I won’t be driving until spring.
That just gives you time to get Red exactly how you want it.
 

Randyzzz

Blown Budget
BENEFACTOR
Gold Member
Lifetime Member
SOA Member
City
Redmond
State
OR
That just gives you time to get Red exactly how you want it.
True. With that in mind, I still wasn’t 100% happy with the color of the indicator lights. One combo I never tried was the original blue filter with the new brighter LED’s. It’s about as close as it comes. Plus I got another Vintage Air knob so the headlamp switch would match the other controls. I’m about ready to bolt the dash in. 02F76E41-A649-4426-B2BB-C6F3DA1B4574.jpeg
 

Randyzzz

Blown Budget
BENEFACTOR
Gold Member
Lifetime Member
SOA Member
City
Redmond
State
OR
Help! Well, mostly either a shoulder to cry on, or some advice. I may have screwed myself in my quest for perfection. I worked on installing the hinge screws. First, a positive note. I love the look and durability of the Elite Cerakote. It did not chip at all with the torx bit, and even the one I dropped didn’t show any signs of damage. So win there. The paint on the hinges, however is another story. B1936FDE-EE41-47A0-A96D-BF28DE8317E2.jpegDoesn’t look too bad from a distance,right? Look closer…C6CA9F98-147A-4554-A977-D7DD89CE710C.jpegA9D0DCF8-2243-4512-B73A-B6F62343D7F2.jpegWhere the shoulder of the bolt touches the hinge, it tends to displace the paint making a slight deformation , or, worst case…CB68A04F-02A6-437B-8090-BEECACF41056.jpeg020DADBA-F8B2-47CD-9D5D-8AA80610137F.jpegTiny chips!😡 The passenger side is much worse- it looks like when the holes were drilled in the hinges there was some chatter and actually there are high points around the holes. Factory hinges- I just welded the mirror holes in case you wondered. I’m at a losss at how to proceed. I understand the causes- first the replacement screws are a slightly different taper than OEM, causing them to seat at the outer edges instead of full flank.86915428-0A89-4049-919D-2E179519B803.jpegPic is of one of the painted screws I’m replacing vs a factory trashed screw. Second the poor drilling of the holes compounds the problem. I’ve touched up the chips but the evidence is still there- if you look close.

So…I’m trying to come up with solutions.

First thought would be to pull all the hinges, sandblast and fix the taper of that nasty hinge, and have them Cerakoted black. The Cerakote is super thin and durable so that would solve most all my issues. (In case you’re wondering, repainting would probably still lead to paint displacement by the screws. Jeep painted the vehicle after the screws were installed…so no such issues.) Or, maybe even powder coat them wrinkle black to match the bumpers and sliders. By using black hinges, I would also feel better about using a black cowl cover that would make sealing my cowl vent so much easier.

Second thought is probably the most creative and craziest. Make tapered spacers so the hinges basically have a straight hole, and then use button head screws to effectively cover the damaged area. Nuts, right? The more I think about this it’s a no-starter.

Third option- live with it. That will be the one (hopefully) imperfection that will make me less paranoid about keeping the whole thing “perfect”. That one imperfection… I’m leaning this way, but the chances of the paint possibly lifting around the bolts does scare me. Those top hinges are a bear to remove once the dash is in, especially with how mine is full of A/C and stuff.

So…what would you do?
 
Last edited:

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
Lifetime Member
SOA Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
Help! Well, mostly either a shoulder to cry on, or some advice. I may have screwed myself in my quest for perfection. I worked on installing the hinge screws. First, a positive note. I love the look and durability of the Elite Cerakote. It did not chip at all with the torx bit, and even the one I dropped didn’t show any signs of damage. So win there. The paint on the hinges, however is another story. View attachment 98056Doesn’t look too bad from a distance,right? Look closer…View attachment 98057View attachment 98058Where the shoulder of the bolt touches the hinge, it tends to displace the paint making a slight deformation , or, worst case…View attachment 98060View attachment 98061Tiny chips!😡 The passenger side is much worse- it looks like when the holes were drilled in the hinges there was some chatter and actually there are high points around the holes. Factory hinges- I just welded the mirror holes in case you wondered. I’m at a losss at how to proceed. I understand the causes- first the replacement screws are a slightly different taper than OEM, causing them to seat at the outer edges instead of full flank.View attachment 98067Pic is of one of the painted screws I’m replacing vs a factory trashed screw. Second the poor drilling of the holes compounds the problem. I’ve touched up the chips but the evidence is still there- if you look close.

So…I’m trying to come up with solutions.

First thought would be to pull all the hinges, sandblast and fix the taper of that nasty hinge, and have them Cerakoted black. The Cerakote is super thin and durable so that would solve most all my issues. (In case you’re wondering, repainting would probably still lead to paint displacement by the screws. Jeep painted the vehicle after the screws were installed…so no such issues.) Or, maybe even powder coat them wrinkle black to match the bumpers and sliders. By using black hinges, I would also feel better about using a black cowl cover that would make sealing my cowl vent so much easier.

Second thought is probably the most creative and craziest. Make tapered spacers so the hinges basically have a straight hole, and then use button head screws to effectively cover the damaged area. Nuts, right? The more I think about this it’s a no-starter.

Third option- live with it. That will be the one (hopefully) imperfection that will make me less paranoid about keeping the whole thing “perfect”. That one imperfection… I’m leaning this way, but the chances of the paint possibly lifting around the bolts does scare me. Those top hinges are a bear to remove once the dash is in, especially with how mine is full of A/C and stuff.

So…what would you do?

Put anti-sieze on the back of the screw heads before you install them. That little bit of lube saves the paint, sometimes. Other then that, I usually gradually tighten all the bolts up evenly, and never really "bow up" on them.

But, no matter what, a little damage will occur. I guess this is why the factory assembled everything before paint. BUT, they never painted the back sides of the hinges/parts.

Damned if you do, damned if you don't.
 

93_Fummins

CJ-8 Member
City
Edmond
State
OK
What about just dabbing the holes with touch up paint during installation so it serves as lube for the fastener and seals any rippling/chipping/peeling? I'm not a paint expert, so if there's something inherently dumb about that, I plead ignorance.

I would get a counter-sink bit to match the angle of the new hardware, personally. That would both touch up the chatter and also give you better fitment with the new screws.
 

RockTractor

Basic User
Member
City
Albuquerque
State
NM
I'm very interested in this topic - I'm close to installing my hinges.

I saw in a catalog (Eastwood?) where they mentioned using heat to soften the paint... I've put that idea in my "toolbox" - but, have never tried it.
 
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