World Cab Retrofit Project

CJ7Pilot

18436572
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Yuba City
State
CA
#1
A few months ago, on one of the other world cab threads, I mentioned that if GR8Tops made a safari cab for the Scrambler, I'd like to buy one. I looked at the LJ safari cabs, and the prices are pushing $5,000 or more, once you get it optioned, painted, and delivered. I figured I'd probably spend $5,000 on one, if it were available for my Jeep.

Then I saw Jeep Addicts disassembled world cab for sale here, for $2,000. The wheels started turning... could I put an actual world cab on my Scrambler for $5,000? :shrug:

Well, probably not... but I decided to give it a try!

I worked out a deal with Jeep Addict, he crated it, shipped it, and it arrived today. :headbang:

The first step of this retrofit journey, is to get all the pieces out of the box:

crate - 2.jpg

It's very well packaged, and has plenty of internal bracing:

crate - 3.jpg

It's all put together with screws, and fortunately, they are screws I can re-use! After 1/2 an hour of removing wood, I finally got to pull some pieces out:

crate - 4.jpg

Finally, after about 2 hours of work, I had everything out of the crate, and the crate was reduced to a trailer full of lumber, which I can also re-use:

crate - 5.jpg

As a bonus, I got some good moving blankets as part of the deal, and a race car blanket that my grandsons are going to love!

This thread may move pretty slowly for a while. There are some things I need to figure out, and there's quite a bit of prep work to do before I can start bolting things together.

I'm excited though, and I think the finished product will be worth the effort! :cheers:
 

Jeep Addict

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Baton Rouge
State
La
#2
So glad it made it in one piece. 2 hours to unpack is quite impressive. We used a lot of screws and they were like 3” screws. I was hoping you wouldn’t be using a screwdriver to unpack it. I forget where the race car blanket came from but it was definitely from a forum member here protecting some Jeep part. Christmas in July I suppose :christmas:
 

ag4ever

Average Nut
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Richmond
State
TX
#4
I was watching a show last night, and the defender 90 hard top they were driving had sliding rear windows. I think it would be neat to get "fuzzy track" and make the rear windows sliders.

Just thinking out loud.

Can't wait to see what ideas you have.

:popcorn:
 

CJ7Pilot

18436572
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CJ-8.com Member
City
Yuba City
State
CA
#5
... I think it would be neat to get "fuzzy track" and make the rear windows sliders....
That exactly what I have in mind! Once I get the top mounted to the body, one of my first stops will be at an RV/camper shell manufacturer, to discuss the possibility of custom sliding windows.

Before that though, I'll at least look in to factory-style windows and pop-outs. I don't have high hopes, but if I can keep it somewhat original, I'll try.

I'd also like to make the barn door window a pop-out. If it could be hinged at the top, and pop open 3-4 inches at the bottom, that would be great for ventilation also. We'll see.... :shrug:
 

ag4ever

Average Nut
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CJ-8.com Member
City
Richmond
State
TX
#6
I'd also like to make the barn door window a pop-out. If it could be hinged at the top, and pop open 3-4 inches at the bottom, that would be great for ventilation also. We'll see.... :shrug:
Be careful with this idea. Vans used to have pop out windows in the rear, but they stopped making them due to the negative pressure zone created behind a vehicle with a tall flat rear surface. It basically sucks in the exhaust fumes through those windows and fills the vehicle. I have experienced that first hand in a mid 70's and mid '80 dodge van. If you do want to make it hinged, Dodge hinges are a thru bolt to the window and use 2 points. Chevy uses a metal frame around the glass and use a piano type hinge. Both have similar bottom latching mechanisms.

The chevy nomads used a channel track for sliding windows. You might be able to find the track and get glass custom cut to fit and build one yourself.
 

CJ7Pilot

18436572
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Yuba City
State
CA
#8
Be careful with this idea. Vans used to have pop out windows in the rear, but they stopped making them due to the negative pressure zone created behind a vehicle with a tall flat rear surface. It basically sucks in the exhaust fumes through those windows and fills the vehicle. I have experienced that first hand in a mid 70's and mid '80 dodge van.
Well, that right there is enough to make me abandon that idea! I'll figure out how best to ventilate through the side windows. :thumbsup:
 

ag4ever

Average Nut
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CJ-8.com Member
City
Richmond
State
TX
#9
Well, that right there is enough to make me abandon that idea! I'll figure out how best to ventilate through the side windows. :thumbsup:
But, if you only have it open on the trails running at slow speeds, it should not cause a problem. But I'd never have them open on streets or highways. I think the '86 (or was it an '87, can't remember) van had warning stickers on those windows stating to not have them open while the vehicle was in motion. Been a long time since I rode in that van.
 

bigwalton

Picture cravin' AK Postal nut
Staff member
SOA Member
City
Dexter
State
MI
#10
:popcorn:

I have my '77 Cherokee with the electric roll down rear window. You DO NOT want anything to do with an open window in the rear at any speed. No faster way to get a headache than to forget that I had the window rolled down and drive somewhere. Usually the exhaust smell inside is so immediate that I get it back up before I'm more than 50 yards from where I start. With the carb it was easy to tell, less so with the EFI now.

I very strongly urge you not to spend even the time it takes to think about making this happen, much less any money.

The sliding side windows in the Safari Cab on my LJ do a fine job moving air through the cab. The issue is that you have to have a rear seat passenger to use them because it's enough of a PITA to climb into the rear that you'll never open them yourself unless you open them once and leave them that way. But the Safari Cab has that separate rear side window that complicates things. If you had a normal-ish Overlander window with the pop-out all the way at the back, then it would be much easier.
 

ag4ever

Average Nut
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Richmond
State
TX
#11
Did some junkyard crawling this morning, here is the warning label that Chrysler put on the rear windows of their mid 80's vans.

20190717_102932.jpg
 

CJ7Pilot

18436572
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Yuba City
State
CA
#15
This whole setup was originally red, and the insides of the roof, sides and doors (as well as the entire rear door) are still red. At some point though, the outside of the sides and doors, and the top of the roof were sandblasted, and left bare.

What looks like brown primer in the photos, is really surface rust. Since I'm probably not going to use the door shells, I experimented on them first (sorry, no photos of the doors). I tried some dry sanding, some rust converter, some Naval Jelly, and some Evaporust. Naval Jelly was pretty effective, and that's what I used most on the door shells. Then I sprayed on some rattle-can primer to keep the rust from returning too quickly.

Evaporust showed some potential though, so I decided to try it on a set of rusty steering knuckles. The problem is, the rusty parts have to be submerged in the liquid in order to work properly. I soaked the steering knuckles overnight, and they came out bright, shiny, and rust-free!

So... I need to be able to submerge the side panels and roof panel. Today I soaked the back ends of the side panels in a tub, and they cleaned up nicely in just a few hours!

rust - 2.jpg

rust - 1.jpg

Tomorrow, I'll make a larger tub out of 2x4s and an old pool liner, so I can soak the long sides.

I'm thrilled with these results! :thumbsup:
 

ag4ever

Average Nut
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CJ-8.com Member
City
Richmond
State
TX
#17
Another option for the evaporust is to use paper towels. You saturate the paper towels and bag the whole thing being sure to keep the part wet with the solution. Don’t let the stuff dry out though, turns into a thick messy molasses like substance.
 
Last edited:

CJ7Pilot

18436572
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Yuba City
State
CA
#18
Here's the longer "tank" for soaking the sides, made with lumber from Jeepaddict's shipping crate. :thumbsup:

rust - 2.jpg

It worked out pretty well! There are a few spots that didn't get submerged, but I can can clean them up using Ag4ever's paper towel method, or with naval jelly.

rust - 3.jpg

Clean metal makes close inspection a lot easier. There are few blemishes, some of which I'll address now, and others that can wait indefinitely (my Scrambler isn't perfect, so the top doesn't need to be perfect either).

Here's something that needs fixing, though:

rust - 1.jpg
That's where the upper barn door hinge bolts on, and there's some pretty good cracking around the top. I'm guessing it's a result of a heavy spare tire, which I will not be mounting to the door. There's no easy way to access the inside of this panel, so I think the best I can do is weld up these cracks... any thoughts?

I'll practice on the door shells first. They have cracks in the usual places, so I can use them figure out my welder settings.
 

ag4ever

Average Nut
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CJ-8.com Member
City
Richmond
State
TX
#19
What are your plans with all the rust proofing plastic plugs?

I’m gonna need to figure something out for the postal top once I start metalworking. Was thinking about getting a plastic casting kit and reproducing them if I can get one out on good shape. Definitely gonna need to do that once the overlander gets in the shop.

Oh, and that is a heck of an investment in evaporust!
 

CJ7Pilot

18436572
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CJ-8.com Member
City
Yuba City
State
CA
#20
Mine all popped out pretty easily, and there were only a couple of them missing. I don't mind using generic plugs, if you'd like these for your restoration. :shrug:
 
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