Spankrjs 1985 Spring Special CJ-7

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
#81
Success with the rear flex line, no damage to the upper frame mounted hard line fitting!!

IMG_20190611_173434915.jpg

I was able to break the frame line fitting from the flex hose with just a line wrench, no torch required up there. This upper fitting is a huge PIA to get to, hidden behind the angle bracket. You can loosen the line from the cross member to get some more slack, and put a torch on it, if necessary. Kind of risky, that close to the gas tank. I have done it before, usually get covered with hot brake fluid and melted rubber LOL!!!

My passenger side, short hard line, did not want to come off the lower end of the flex line. So I cut the rubber hose, removed the lower part of the flex hose/hard line as an assembly, put a torch on it, got it off.

IMG_20190611_173448525.jpg

After getting the flex line replaced, I rebuilt the rear drum brakes. My drums still had screws securing them to the stock two piece axle hub. I had to "make" this tool to break the screws free.

IMG_20190611_174044306.jpg

Passenger side looks OK, wheel cylinder rubber did not look too bad:

IMG_20190611_174049612.jpg

IMG_20190611_174057836.jpg

Driver side looks OK, too, wheel cylinder rubber did not look too bad on this side, either:

IMG_20190611_174113507.jpg

IMG_20190611_174109658.jpg

After a quick shot of the garden hose, the dust came off, everything looks new, except the wheel cylinders:

IMG_20190611_174435020.jpg

IMG_20190611_174451528.jpg

IMG_20190611_174440320.jpg

Looks like the owner before JeepAddict put new brake pads/hardware on the rear, to match new pads on the front. I was glad to not find any leaking axle seals. I am pretty sure the axles have a bit too much "in and out" play, I will check it later with the dial indicator to see. For now, the rear bearings seem fine. In the future, either an upgrade to Moser axles or Warn Full Float kit. I have played with the two piece stock axles before, I usually end up bending the hubs during removal. I don't waste too much time with them anymore.
 

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
#82
I took the pictures, so a quick "how I put rear drums back together". Not a step by step, just how I do it. NOTE - do one side at a time, to keep from mixing up parts, more on this later.

First, I removed the old, installed the new wheel cylinder. Remove the bleeder off the wheel cylinder before you remove/install it. Almost impossible to get the wheel cylinder in place with the bleeder screw installed.

IMG_20190611_180900086.jpg

IMG_20190611_180906017.jpg

Next, I install the swing arm part to the rear shoe.

IMG_20190611_181311444.jpg

Install the parking brake cable through the bottom of the swing arm.

IMG_20190611_181358510.jpg

Install the rear show to the backing plate.

IMG_20190611_181712171.jpg

Install the strut, with its spring next.

IMG_20190611_181714533.jpg

Install the gold looking piece on the backing plate post, then the cable. I also installed the cable bracket to the rear shoe.

IMG_20190611_182616803.jpg

Install the rear shoe spring.

IMG_20190611_182800542.jpg

Install the front shoe, and its yellow spring:

IMG_20190611_182939890.jpg

The next part, I do my way. I install the cable end to the adjuster bracket, then the lower big spring to the same bracket. I do this WITHOUT the adjuster screw thing installed. I do it this way by hand, easy to install. I find it easier to gently pry the shoes apart after the lower bracket/spring is installed, and then install the adjuster screw. That's how I do it, I find it to be pain free.

IMG_20190611_183226926.jpg
 

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
#83
Another picture, showing the lower bracket/cable/spring installed WITHOUT the adjuster screw in place.

IMG_20190611_183239295.jpg

Through all of my years of messing with Jeep CJ rear drum brakes, I have found this to be the best way to install the lower stuff. If the adjuster screw is in place, then you have to really pry/pull on the spring to get it in place. Hard to do with the rear axle hub in the way. It can be done, and I can do it that way, just a PIA in my experience.

Next, I anti-sieze the hell out of the adjuster.

IMG_20190611_183332989.jpg

Finally, gently pry the two shoes apart, install the adjuster screw thing.

IMG_20190611_184624108.jpg

Finished:

IMG_20190611_184948990.jpg

Now, not every thing went perfect.

I started on the passenger side, it had a new, regular "Left Hand Thread" adjuster screw installed. The Driver side had the same "Left Hand Thread" adjuster screw installed.

The Passenger side should have the backward thread, "Right Hand Thread" adjuster screw installed.
The Driver side should have the regular thread, "Left Hand Thread" adjuster screw installed.

To make sure, when you install the screws, both sides little wheels should be rolled "upward" to spread the brake shoes. Upward, if you are on the back side of the backing plate looking at the adjuster hole slot.

Also, the adjuster screws generally have an "R" or "L" stamped on them. "R" for Right Side/passenger, "L" for Left Side/driver. Or, could be for the thread pitch, "L" for left hand, "R" for right hand.

Someone can correct me if I'm wrong.

Anyway, there should be different adjuster screws on each side.

Luckily, a few years ago at Sandblast, I had the passenger side rear drum brake malfunctioned on my tan Scrambler. So, I bought a spare passenger side adjusting kit, thinking I had some damaged parts. I did't need the parts then, but I need the adjuster now. IIRC, JeeperDD went to the NAPA to pick it up for me, thanks again Dustin!!!!!!!

IMG_20190611_192419596.jpg

So, I need to swap out my adjusters, no big deal.

I also found a broken strut spring on the driver side.

IMG_20190611_192438747.jpg

I did not have a spare, but I found some at NAPA that should work.

All the old parts:

IMG_20190611_193821275.jpg

Up next, I need to install the adjusters, the new strut bar springs, and hook up the hard lines to the wheel cylinders and flex lines. So, some backwards, then forwards.

That's it for now.
 

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
#84
I needed to change/swap the adjuster screws from side to side, no big deal. I also needed to install the new equalizer strut springs. Again, no big deal. You can simply just remove the front shoe on each side to do that.

But, for some reason, I could not get the driver side hard brake line to thread into the wheel cylinder. I spent about an hour fighting it, finally just took everything apart on that side:

IMG_20190612_180853642.jpg

I removed the line from the spring perch, and loosened the wheel cylinder, still no go.

IMG_20190612_180911545.jpg

I even left the rubber drop line disconnected from the axle housing, and the driver side hard line loose from the drop line.

IMG_20190612_180923653.jpg




I eventually pulled the wheel cylinder bolts out completely, and was finally able to get the hard line to thread in.

IMG_20190612_180906161.jpg

Anyway, a huge PIA. Leaving the hard lines loose from the drop line makes it easier to start the hard lines into each wheel cylinder. After starting these ends, I threaded the hard lines into the "still loose from axle housing" center drop line. After all the lines were started, I then tightened them up. I then finally tightened the hard lines back down to the spring perches/diff cover, and finally bolted the drop line down to the axle housing.
For whatever reason, I guess the "angle of the dangle" on the driver side, I had to loosen the wheel cylinder from the backing plate to get it started. For now on, I will start these hard lines into the wheel cylinders BEFORE putting all the other drum brake stuff back together. Lesson learned.

I purchased these springs from NAPA to replace the broken spring:

IMG_20190612_181034287.jpg

Was not happy to see the wonderful "Made in China" crap. Unfortunately, it seems like more and more of the stuff I get from NAPA is made there.

Anyway, they are a bit longer then stock, have some weird loop on them, but they will work.

IMG_20190612_181102747.jpg

IMG_20190612_181114178.jpg

The springs are longer then stock, but they compress easily enough, install fine, should work out well.

IMG_20190612_182357196.jpg

IMG_20190612_182402558.jpg

I installed them with the "weird loop thing" pointing down, and to the back. They will clear everything that way. You could cut them off, too.

Anyway, rear brakes all installed, just need to adjust them. Then, master cylinder swap out time.

That's it for now!!!
 

Belizeit

CJ-8 Member
CJ-8.com Member
City
River Ridge
State
La
#85
I've gotten brake hardware kits from napa and they are Chinee also. Getting harder and harder to get good parts. Hardware kits seem to be ok, but some of the other parts, not always.
 

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
#86
The last of the brake work, changing out the master cylinder.

IMG_20190614_163700720_HDR.jpg

Removal is fairly easy. Remove the two lines off the side of the MC, take out two bolts, and remove the cotter pin from under the dashboard. The last few MC's I have changed have been on PB Jeeps, they are a bit easier. On the Non-Power brakes, you have to go under the dash, pull off a cotter pin/washer from the master cylinder rod, then slide the rod off the brake pedal assembly. Not terrible, not fun, either.

Once removed, I noticed the fire wall had this plastic on it, behind the master cylinder. I have never noticed this before??

IMG_20190614_164933097.jpg

These lines came off easy, no corrosion or problems.

IMG_20190614_164940105.jpg

New cylinder and old cylinder match.

IMG_20190614_164956206.jpg

Besides potential rubber degradation, the other reason for changing all the brake parts was to make it easier to clean out/flush the system. The MC had some sludge, the fluid was black as coffee.

IMG_20190614_165003435.jpg

IMG_20190614_171535813_HDR.jpg

You are supposed to bleed the master cylinder before you install it. I always bolt it back up to the firewall to bleed it. I saved the old lines off my red Scrambler, cut down and bent to shape, to make MC bleed tubes:

IMG_20190614_165847334.jpg

IMG_20190614_170229204.jpg

The brakes bled out easy enough. Before bleeding the brakes, I adjusted the rear brakes. When I pulled off one of the rear drums, a nice SPIDER was there to greet me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

IMG_20190614_172842780.jpg

Anyway, brakes bled out easy enough, firm pedal, good to go.
 

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
#87
While the tires were off the Jeep, and it was up on jack stands, I decided to grease everything up.

First issue, someone put the front driveshaft in backwards, making it impossible to grease the joint at the front output shaft.

IMG_20190615_085554258_HDR.jpg

IMG_20190615_085604746.jpg

Next issue, not a real problem, but the rear driveshaft transfer case end u-joint does NOT have a grease fitting, the pinion end does.

IMG_20190615_090520002.jpg

IMG_20190615_090541681_HDR.jpg

I was glad that both driveshaft slip joints were good and tight. Since I need to pull the front driveshaft out to spin it around, I will change out the u-joints while it is down. On the rear, the rear pinion is leaking a bit, so I will swap in new u-joints here while it is down, as well.

The steering linkage joints greased up fine, and the clutch linkage, too. The rear axle was a 1/2 quart low, the Dana 300 was about a 1/4 quart low. The T5 was full, full of ATF, and the front axle was full. I plan on changing all these fluids out soon.

This Jeep came from Nevada, originally out of California. I got it from JeepAddicts climate controlled ware house. The tires had no cracks, up until Saturday. The tires that came on it were new, well at least 10 years old, and from Nevada. Still had great tread, held air, NO CRACKS. Until Saturday. Drove it about 10 miles to a job site, got out, all four tires on the ground looked like this, inside and outside, all the way around.



IMG_20190615_105924477_HDR.jpg IMG_20190615_105941638.jpg IMG_20190615_105951581.jpg

Two final pictures of the Jeep with the old tires on it.

IMG_20190615_125741562.jpg

IMG_20190615_125810289.jpg
 

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
#88
Since I was close to a Good Year tire shop, I bit the bullet.

IMG_20190615_143534470.jpg

I purchased/had them install five new P235/75/15 Good Year Wranglers on it, the stock tires.

I could have bought these tires cheaper, from say Wal-Mart, but the guys at Good Year were very careful with the wheels, did not damage the paint at all. So, very happy about that.

Not the best picture, but I think it looks much better with the "stock" tires back on it.

IMG_20190615_162256995_HDR.jpg

That's it for now :wave:
 

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
#89
I had noticed "too much end play" in the rear axles when I was adjusting the brakes. I finally put a dial indicator on them to check the end play.

IIRC, it is supposed to be .004 - .008, .006 preferred. I have .01, so too much.

You only shim the driver side, that will set the play for both bearings, since the axle shafts should both be bottomed out on the centering block in the differential.

I tapped the driver side axle in with a hammer, then pulled in and out on it, this is what I have:

IMG_20190621_181037929.jpg

I checked the passenger side, close to the same end play reading:

IMG_20190621_182203421.jpg

I can hear a slight sound from the rear when turning sharp on the street, not enough play for the seals to start leaking, but i need to address this sooner rather then later.

Just trying to decide between purchasing some Moser one piece axles and installing them, or installing my "spare" Warn AMC20 Full Float kit. The Warn kit will be way overkill for this Jeep, for my intended purposes.
 

xatu40

CJ-8 Member
CJ-8.com Member
City
DeBary
State
FL
#90
Hoping to jog your memory from May on the upper radiator hose. Looks like you got a NAPA 7498 to fit.
I started with AutoZone, they only list a Dayco B71013 and says trim to fit. Unfortunately, I need to stretch it to fit. Doesn't clear the serpentine belt. Checking out NAPA's website, they only list NBH 7266 as fitting. I was wondering if you had a reason or recall as to how you ended up with the one below. My NAPA store is 30 minutes away, so hoping to knock this out in one trip.

1565980448533.png

Thank you in advance for any insight.
 

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
#91
Hoping to jog your memory from May on the upper radiator hose. Looks like you got a NAPA 7498 to fit.
I started with AutoZone, they only list a Dayco B71013 and says trim to fit. Unfortunately, I need to stretch it to fit. Doesn't clear the serpentine belt. Checking out NAPA's website, they only list NBH 7266 as fitting. I was wondering if you had a reason or recall as to how you ended up with the one below. My NAPA store is 30 minutes away, so hoping to knock this out in one trip.

View attachment 75433

Thank you in advance for any insight.
I have had problems with upper radiator hoses not fitting. NAPA online calls for this 7498 to fit, and it does, with a stock radiator and thermostat housing. I have the same upper hose on my green Scrambler, fits fine. I have a different upper hose on my red Scrambler, can't remember why?
 

xatu40

CJ-8 Member
CJ-8.com Member
City
DeBary
State
FL
#92
I have had problems with upper radiator hoses not fitting. NAPA online calls for this 7498 to fit, and it does, with a stock radiator and thermostat housing. I have the same upper hose on my green Scrambler, fits fine. I have a different upper hose on my red Scrambler, can't remember why?
Thanks. Stopped by and they confirmed the 7498 was in their system. Just have to wait till tomorrow to get it.

I truly appreciate all the effort and detail you put into your documenting your activities. Wish I would have read this thread before diving into my water pump replacement. Did learn something new, and I don't think you mentioned it. It's obvious when the radiator and fan are out of the way, but I never knew that the alternator bracket had a place to insert a 1/2" breaker bar. Makes it super easy to tension the belt.

1565993496627.png
 

tower210

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Olathe
State
KS
#93
Thanks. Stopped by and they confirmed the 7498 was in their system. Just have to wait till tomorrow to get it.

I truly appreciate all the effort and detail you put into your documenting your activities. Wish I would have read this thread before diving into my water pump replacement. Did learn something new, and I don't think you mentioned it. It's obvious when the radiator and fan are out of the way, but I never knew that the alternator bracket had a place to insert a 1/2" breaker bar. Makes it super easy to tension the belt.

View attachment 75439

My 258 had this design...I always hated that it didn't have spring tensioner......
 

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
#96
AMC 20 Two Piece Axle Disclaimer:

We all know the inherent weakness of the stock two piece axles when compared to one piece axles. I'm not here to rehash all of this. Stock tires, stock power, no locking differentials, non-hardcore usage, they are OK. IF I would have had any damage to the OEM shafts or hubs, I would not have bought "replacement" two piece axle components. The OEM stuff is bad enough, I can not imagine how terrible "Made in China Replacement" drive train stuff is. IF I would have had damaged shafts/hubs, I would have swapped in Moser 1-Piece axles, no questions asked. My OEM shafts and hubs are good, I just needed new bearings and seals. These parts cost around $100. The hub puller was another $130. So, $230 to rebuild stock axles. Quality one piece axle kits do not cost much more, you can do the math. I wanted to keep this Jeep stock, the OEM axles and hubs are fine, so I reused them. If I spin a hub two weeks from now you all can tell me "I told you so"!!!!

So, if you want to see how I rebuilt my stock two piece axles, have at it. If not, skip ahead.


When I rebuilt my rear brakes a few moths ago, I noticed that my rear axle bearing had too much play, around 10 thousandths, should be between 4-8 thousandths. I also started to hear a strange noise from the driver side rear tire when making hard right turns. So, time to investigate. I moved the red Scrambler out of the garage, Spring Special inside.

20191124_111634.jpg

I bought this special hub puller to ease rear axle hub removal. I figure I can use it on my Jeep, and loan it out to some of my friends who still have stock axles. It cost around $130, well worth it, IF you are going to reuse the stock two piece axles.

20191124_113806.jpg

20191124_113833.jpg

Pictures of the hub puller installed. You can use an impact socket on the hex end of the shaft, AND/OR place the silver bar on the hex end of the shaft and strike it with a hammer.

20191124_115059.jpg

20191124_115104.jpg

Make sure you have everything secured correctly/square. ALSO, leave the nut threaded on the end of the axle shaft. There is a whole lot of force involved here. When the hub comes free, it sounds like a gun going off, will scare the crap out of you. If the nut is not on the end of the axle, the hub/hub puller will come flying off and cause some damage to you/nearby stuff.

20191124_115310.jpg

I oiled the threaded shaft, used my Dewalt electric impact, and tightened the shaft down. I then put the silver bar on, hit it with a 5 pound hammer. Repeated twice, hub came off.

20191124_121102.jpg

20191124_115806.jpg

The combination of the impact/hammer made quick work of this. Both hubs came off, no problem. If you have never done this before, be warned, it will scare you when the hub comes free!!!

With both hubs off, I checked the rear axle bearing play. With axle pushed in all the way:

20191127_205800.jpg

And the same axle pulled outward:

20191127_205819.jpg

Around 11 thousands, so way out of spec.
 

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
#98
So, the rear axle bearings have too much play, causing the wheel hubs to move in and out too much. The noise I heard on the driver side rear wheel, when turning hard right, was the brake shoe retaining spring cups rubbing against the brake drum.

20191127_205919.jpg

20191127_205926.jpg

The "polished line" inside the brake drum where the spring retainers were rubbing it:

20191127_205951.jpg

No picture, but to pull the axles out of the axle tubes, I placed the wheel hub back on the shafts. Threaded the nut on, then used the wheel hub as a slide hammer to free the axles. With stock axles/bearings, the outer bearing race is a very tight fit in the end of the axle tube. It should not be a slip fit. If it is, you have a tore up bearing, or the bearing has spun in the tube damaging it.

Passenger side bearing had no grease left. I would presume the inner seal went bad allowing the grease to be flushed out. BUT, there was no gear oil smell on the bearing. Good thing I pulled it, a dry bearing can destroy the axle shaft and/or the rear axle housing.

20191129_110628.jpg

20191129_110635.jpg

Driver side still had grease.

20191129_110651.jpg

20191129_110655.jpg

I had to use a slide hammer to pull out the inner seals, They should also be a very tight fit.

20191129_150312.jpg

The Factory Service Manual will tell you to remove the bearings with a press. I used a hammer and punch, about 5 minutes each side, was able to knock the bearing off. This is fine for removal, NOT for bearing installation. Again, the bearings were still a very tight fit on the axle shafts, no damage.

20191129_164704.jpg

I kept the nuts on the end of the axle shafts to avoid damaging the threads.

Picture of the parts I used: bearings, inner seals, outer seals. I did not realize that the bearings were made in China, I thought SKF was still good?

20191130_104534.jpg
 

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
#99
I have been using this grease for awhile now, seems to work great. My red Scrambler has 40,000 miles on this wheel bearing grease, no problems.

20191130_104548_HDR.jpg

The hard part about pressing bearings on is finding the right sized tube/pipe/spacer to press the new bearings on. I broke apart one of the old axle bearings, used a Dremel to "machine" out the inside of the bearing cup, and had a great press tool. Took about 10 minutes with the Dremel. I "bored" out the inside of this piece so that is easily slips on and off the axle shaft. Worked great.

20191130_145243.jpg

I did not take a picture of pressing the axle bearings on. On the stock shafts, you press the bearing on from the hub side until they hit the "ridge" on the axle shaft. The bearing cone is directed so that the bearing race slides on from the wheel side of the axle shaft. 100% opposite from a one piece axle.

The inner seals did not have that green coating on the outer ridge:

20191130_145411.jpg

So, I used some of this sealer inside the axle tubes to seal the seal edge to the housing:

20191130_145416.jpg

I found this thing in my garage, worked perfect as a seal driver:

20191130_145426.jpg

The seal installed. This is a PIA. Make sure you drive the seal in true and straight. The rubber lip on the outside edge of the inner seal actually wiped back the sealant, so maybe no extra sealant is necessary.

20191130_152652.jpg

I checked the inner seal for a straight install, good to go.

20191130_152710.jpg

Greased up the cavity between the inner seal and where the axle bearing rides:

20191130_160632.jpg

Carefully slid in the axles shaft, through the inner seal, then into the differential side gear splines. Then, gently placed the race around the bearing cone, and tapped it in with a punch and hammer.

20191130_161757.jpg

On the PASSENGER side, the bearing/bearing race should be flush with the end of the axle tube. It is close here, not 100% yet.

20191130_161801.jpg
 

spankrjs

Scrambler Junkie
LIFETIME
CJ-8.com Member
City
Biloxi
State
MS
I temporarily substituted the "self locking nuts" with regular nuts, and bolted on the passenger side brake backing plate.

20191201_124545.jpg

I then unbolted and removed it. The bearing is now flush with the outer end of the axle housing.

20191201_124724.jpg

On the PASSENGER side, NO shims are used. I am now 100% finished with this side. There will be no reason to unbolt anything again. So, I applied some RTV to the end of the axle housing:

20191201_125321.jpg

Applied wheel bearing grease to the inside of the outer wheel seal. This part of the seal rides directly against the face of the wheel bearing, and seals the hole in the brake backing plate completely. I applied RTV to the surrounding metal plate part of the seal, to seal it to the outer face of the brake backing plate.

20191201_130414_HDR.jpg

And all installed, torqued to 35 foot pounds. I forgot the outer dust shield in this picture, so I had to take it back apart and put on the metal dust shield.

20191201_131054.jpg

So, the passenger side is complete, as far as the axle/wheel bearing is concerned. When you go to install the driver side axle shaft, the shaft will bottom out on the "thrust block", which rides on the differential cross shaft. When it does, the driver side wheel bearing race will protrude from the face of the rear axle housing. This is where the shims come into play, more on that in a bit.

This is the "thrust block".

20191201_133719.jpg

On one piece axle installs, 9 time out of 10, it has to be removed. One piece axles use a different style bearing then the stock AMC system. On the one piece axle "unit" bearings, the "play" is built into the bearings. Moser recommends the bearings to stick out past the housing ends on both sides a hair, so that the brake backing plates actually apply some pre-load to the bearings. Stock AMC two piece axles is the exact opposite.

OK, driver side axle slid in, bearing race installed, again lightly driving it in with a punch and hammer. This is as far as it goes:

20191201_133829.jpg

Why doesn't it go in all the way? Well, because both axle shafts are hitting the center thrust block. The passenger side bearing/race will not move outward because it's brake backing plate is bolted on solid. On the stock two piece axles, instead of thinking about it like two separate bearing/axle assemblies, you have to think of it as one long axle that is connected. Both bearing cones face outward, and the play for both bearings is adjusted on the DRIVER side ONLY. A few more pictures might help explain it some more.

So, the bearing sticks out of the axle housing on the driver side. The shims you use don't actually "shim" the bearings, they actually shim the driver side brake backing plate outward. As you can see, the shims go around the bearing assembly:

20191201_133849.jpg

The bearing/race assembly actually hits the brake backing plate. You can see the nice "perfect circle" on the brake backing plate where the bearing race hits it.

20191201_133911.jpg

20191201_133917.jpg
 
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